DIY Free Standing Pull-Up Bar

DIY Free Standing Pull-Up Bar

In a bid to train for the World Record for Chin-ups in a 24 hour period, Charles Rankin came to Simplified Building to create the perfect pull-up bar to meet all of his particular expectations. Charles needed a pull-up bar that was free-standing, portable enough he could take it to work and sturdy enough to hold up to his grueling training schedule that consisted of sometimes 2-3 thousand chin-ups a day. The result is the custom pull-up bar that you see today which was made with Kee Klamp fittings and pipe.

Charles put his new pull-up bar to the test immediately after receiving it. In one week he did 5,546 chin-ups and in 6 months he was able to break 151,450 chin-ups averaging 800 chin-ups a day for 6 months which leaves no question as to the sturdiness of this pull-up bar.

Because of the unique fittings used in the structure, Charles is able to disassemble and reassemble the pull-up bar for transport allowing him to train anywhere he wants.

Since we love the design of the pull-up bar so much and how it has helped Charles train thus far, we wanted to share the design with you and show you how you can build your own:

Fittings Used to Build the Pull-Up Bar

DIY Free Standing Pull-Up Bar Plans

We've Done the Work For You

Looking to build your own free-standing pull-up bar? We've done the work for you and put together a simple kit to save you the time of adding individual pipe and fittings to your cart.

Specs:

  • Length: 4'
  • Depth: 6'
  • Height: 7.5'

Assembly:

  • clock Thirty Minutes
  • wrench Allen Key

What's included:

All of the pipe and fittings needed to assemble the pull-up bar.

What's not:

Tools, Padding for Hands, Muscles


The free standing pull-up bar design utilizes just three different Kee Klamp fittings: the 90 Degree Elbow, the 30 to 60 Degree Single Socket Tee, and the Three Socket Tee.

The 90 Degree Elbow is used in places where the structure changes direction in a 90-degree turn. You can see this used in both the base and top of the pull-up bar.

The 30 to 60 Degree Single Socket Tee is used to provide extra strength the structure. Since the triangle is the strongest shape, the 30 to 60 Degree Single Socket Tee is used in both the base and top of the pull-up to create a triangle to provide stability to the structure.

And finally, the Three-Socket Tee is used at the base of the pull-up bar to join the bottom sections of the frame. The Three-Socket Tee allows you to join three different sections of pipe and as you can see in the image above, the Three-Socket Tee helps to create the intersecting section where the base and pull-up bar meet.

DIY Free Standing Pull-Up Bar Dimensions

The pull-up bar is 7'6" tall while the base of the frame is 6' long by 4' wide.

Overall, Charles has been happy with the pull-up bar and appreciates the sturdy construction of the frame.

"I am loving it and I would like to challenge you to do just an hour worth of pull-ups and let me know what you get. I can't thank you guys enough for all the help."

Now the challenge is on you, try browsing our fittings to create a pull-up bar that will work for you or contact our projects team for free design assistance.

If you need a bit more inspiration, take a look at our article titled DIY Freestanding Pull Up Station and Workout Structure or our article titled Pull Up Bar - Adjustable and Portable for some more DIY pull-up bar ideas!

Our Team is Here to Help

Simplified Building Team

Our experts will help you select the items you need to create your project.

Shopping Cart